Argo: Film Review

I was watching last showing of “Lincoln” after a work session. With my head was still hot, I came 5 minutes late and sat under the AC vent. The movie was too serious, I might get ill from the wind and I decided to walk out of the XXI theater. Not because of my disrespect for Spielberg’s work, but I was just not in the mood and physical condition to see American history.

To rebound, at home I played another American history “Argo“, well, used to be classified history. It’s a story about a CIA operative Tony Mendez (performed by Ben Affleck) who during the Iranian hostage crisis in 1978. It was declassified by President Clinton in 1997, thus Ben Affleck with the help of other actor turned producer George Clooney produced this movie which won The Academy Award for several awards, including the prestigious Best Picture category.

Argo Movie PosterThe story starts right in 1978 Tehran, Iran; where Iranian people besieged United States embassy demanding the return of Reza Pahlevi, a former dictator President of Iran, who was couped by Ayatollah Khomeini. The broke through and held hostage all diplomats and staff but six people managed to escape through back door and seek refuge in residence of Canadian Ambassador. The CIA brainstormed on how to rescue the six people. The pace of the movie was set to tense right from the starts. Then the idea of doing a fake movie production, with location scouting to the exotic middle east as a cover-up motivation to get the six people out of the country.

Then the nuance of the movie shifted into laid-back for preparation in Hollywood, looking for credible key persons to produce the fake movie. When the plan was set, Mendez entered Teheran via Istanbul, and forged through the plan with the six hostages acted as film production crew. During which the tension never loosen up, and I literally hanging on the edge of my sofa at key thrilling moments. And I literally clapped when they flew and cleared from Iranian airspace.

A good movie makes you believe in the story, and the fact that it was a real story which was kept under wrap for so many years, add the authenticity to the story. The production value kept it authentic like it was from the 70s, with great directing from Affleck.

I won’t get much into the movie making. I was just inspired that with a great mission and compelled by a great cause, one can succeed in a mission which has only slightest chance of success. Something that I can prescribe to in my current situation.

A great real story about a fake movie for a real purpose. How about a real story about a real movie for a great real purpose? Nothing is impossible.

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